Berlin is a great city and has got lots of sights to offer.
Here I show you a little list of nice things to see in Berlin:

The Berliner Dom:

The Berliner Dom (Berlin Cathedral), completed in 1905, is Berlin’s largest and most important Protestant church as well as the sepulchre of the Prussian Hohenzollern dynasty. This outstanding high-renaissance baroque monument has linked the Hohenzollerns to German Protestantism for centuries and undergone renewed phases of architectural renovation since the Middle Ages. First built in 1465 as a parish church on the Spree River it was only finally completed in 1905 under the last German Kaiser -Wilhelm II. Damaged during the Second World War it remained closed during the GDR years and reopened after restoration in 1993.
The Dome is a well frequented venue for concerts and readings. Guided tours are available. The entrance fee includes autoguides in a variety of languages.

Adresse:
Lustgarten 1
10178 Berlin
zum Stadtplan

The Brandenburg Gate:

The Brandenburg Gate is one of Berlin’s most important monuments – a landmark and symbol all in one with over two hundred years of history. A former symbol of the divided city, it drew visitors who used to climb an observation platform in order to get a glimpse of the world behind the Iron Curtain, on the other side of the barren “death-strip” which separated east from west Berlin, geographically and politically. It was here that on June 12, 1987, Ronald Regan issued his stern command to his cold war adversary admonishing him with the words: “Mr. Gorbachov – tear down this wall!”. The speech delivered to West Berliners was also audible on the east side of the Gate and echoed President von Weizsacker’s words which translate as: “The German question is open as long as the Brandenburg Gate is closed.”

Adresse:
Pariser Platz
10117 Berlin
zum Stadtplan

The East Side Gallery is a 1.3 km-long painted stretch of the former Berlin Wall along the Mühlenstrasse in former East Berlin. It is the largest open-air gallery in the world with over one hundred original mural paintings. Galvanised by the extraordinary events which were changing the world, artists from all around the globe rushed to Berlin after the fall of the Wall, leaving a visual testimony of the joy and spirit of liberation which erupted at the time.

Wall murals had previously been a highlight for visitors and a Berlin attraction for years but were only to be found on the western side of the Wall. The artists transformed the grey concrete rearticulating this into a lasting expression of freedom and reconciliation.
Some of the best known paintings such as “The Mortal Kiss” by Dimitrji Vrubel, of Erich Honecker and Leonid Brezhnev’s mouth-to-mouth embrace and Birgit Kinder’s Trabi (Trabant) knocking down the Wall. They have provided popular postcard material until today. The paintings which still reflect the patchwork, eclectic and bohemian atmosphere of Berlin today are a mixed-bag of surreal images, political statements and graffiti-like effusions stretching from the Oberbaum Brücke to the Ostbahnhof.

The murals are under heritage protection. Restoration of over a quarter of the paintings which have suffered decay caused by defacement, weather and air pollution is underway.
Mühlenstraße (near Oberbaumbrücke)
10243 Berlin
zum Stadtplan

The Hackesche Höfe

Berlin’s Hackesche Höfe (Hof means courtyard) – just off S-Bahn Station Hackescher Markt, is a heritage site consisting of eight communicating, restored rear courtyards accessible through Rosenthalerstrasse 40’s main arched entrance. The area, also known as the Scheunenviertel is one of Berlin’s top entertainment hubs, popular with Berliners and visitors alike and a magnet for club-goers since the 1990’s.

The restoration of this heritage building completed in 1997, was a central factor in the emergence of one of Berlin’s liveliest quarters since reunification. Since the 1990s the area around Hackesche Höfe has been synonymous with the vibrant urban renewal of the New Berlin, combining a mix of business and offices, residential housing, entertainment venues, art galleries, boutiques, bars and restaurants - the unmissable urban mix of the New Berlin which emerged in the 1990s. The energy of post-unification Germany, a quest for renewal and reinvention, found expression in cutting-edge creativity in the arts and fashion and state-of-the-art design. The result is an original, new entrepreneurial spirit characterised by an exuberant convergence of life with lifestyle. The Höfe are an example of how this spirit was realised.

S-Bahn Station: Hackescher Markt

Museumsinsel:

Berlin’s Museumsinsel (Museum Island) is a unique ensemble of five museums, including the Pergamon Museum - built a the small island in Berlin’s Spree River between 1824 and 1930. A cultural and architectural monument of great significance it was awarded UNESCO World Heritage Status in 1999. Berlin’s own Acropolis of the arts is considered unique because it illustrates the evolution of modern museum design over the course of the 20th century and its collections span six thousand years of human artistic endeavour.

Its artefacts, originating largely from the private collections of the Prussian royal family, have been administered since 1918 by the Stiftung Preussicher Kulturbesitz (Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation). The first museum, the Altes Museum (1830) considered to be Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s neoclassical masterpiece is Germany’s oldest museum. The development of the area as a museum complex and the construction of the other four museums stemmed from King Friedrich Wilhelm’s (1840-1861) romantic vision of a refuge of the arts and sciences similar to the Forum of ancient Rome. UNESCO defined it “an outstanding example of the Enlightenment vision of making art publicly accessible, given material form in a central urban setting”.

Museumsinsel (Bodestraße)
10178 Berlin
zum Stadtplan